Currently Reading: Top Three Stories that Caught our Attention this Week

This week we've been busy planning the 2013 Holiday Lookbook, preparing for the November Pop Shop, and finalizing logistical details for the Fall Fashion Expo -- and that doesn't include all of the workshops we're about to announce! To be honest, it's hard to keep up with the news when our heads are deep in spreadsheets, phone calls, and coordination work... can you relate?   

Well... if you only get a chance to read a few articles this week, here are the top three that caught our attention:  

1. 'Made in USA' movement fuels new manufacturing hubs in apparel

  Christel Ellsberg is an expert tailor and pattern maker for Raleigh Denim, which makes American-made jeans. Photo credit: Raleigh Denim 

 

Christel Ellsberg is an expert tailor and pattern maker for Raleigh Denim, which makes American-made jeans. Photo credit: Raleigh Denim 

Most exciting was seeing Raleigh, NC mentioned in this article as one of the hubs for Made in USA apparel. There's been lots of talk about manufacturing moving back to the United States and often this manufacturing boom occurs in New York and Los Angeles due to the high density of fashion and apparel brands located in those cities. Here in Raleigh, NC designers are competing for attention with high-tech, high-growth companies that have been enticing venture capitalists from Silicon Valley to come out for a visit. Being mentioned for something other than new technology is refreshing... take our word for it. 

2. A Celeb-Backed Apparel Factory in Haiti Goes High-End

  Workers at IRII are trained in multiple skills, increasing their employability Photo credit: David Rochkind for Bloomberg Businessweek  

 

Workers at IRII are trained in multiple skills, increasing their employability

Photo credit: David Rochkind for Bloomberg Businessweek

 

Haiti has a special place in our hearts. Mor Aframian (Redress Raleigh's Communications and Branding Director) has visited the country and worked with a sewing group located in Port-a-Prince, sharing with them ideas to make their products marketable to a larger audience, understanding their limitations, and learning about the students' work ethic and quality of work. The most significant takeaway from the article is that the training program enables workers to "have a chance to make more money, because they have more skills " says instructor Roody Alexis. It feels good to know there are manufacturing facilities around the world that understand the value of investing in their employees. 

3. What is the business value in driving sustainable lifestyles?

  Shoppers at Westfield shopping centre in the west London, England. Big brands are making a great show of helping their customers take the green option but will it work? Photograph: Oli Scarff/Getty Images

 

Shoppers at Westfield shopping centre in the west London, England. Big brands are making a great show of helping their customers take the green option but will it work? Photograph: Oli Scarff/Getty Images

Here's a new fact you can share with family and friends: "Together with UK communications specialist Futerra, BSR recently released a survey of top business leaders that suggests the vast majority (98%) of consumers will be interested in sustainable lifestyles by 2018" (The Guardian). However, at the end of the day it seems that money is the only thing that speaks when companies are determining if they'll be adapting sustainable business practices. More often then not businesses see the initial expense attributed to "going green" and fail to see the "growing market share" that lies beyond. It really is up to the customers to vote for more sustainable lifestyles, by putting their money where their mouth is. 

That does it for us today! Let us know what you're currently reading by tweeting at us @RedressRaleigh or posting it our Facebook page, Google+ page, or email us!