Doing more with less in 2016

About this time every year, I start to feel a little itchy, and not just because I’m wearing wool again. There’s something about winter and that inevitable creep toward the new year that makes me itch for change.  

In the past, I’ve used that itch to fuel the torturous practice of creating my new year’s resolutions -- a list of things I’d promise myself to do, see or become over the next 12 months. While there was nothing wrong with working toward “the best me I could be” in the new year *cue Polyanna soundtrack*, my list never did what I hoped it would. Within a few weeks, I’d either forget about the list entirely, or start feeling guilty for not following through on all those positive intentions.

So this year, instead of piling on a list of expectations I’m sure to disappoint myself with, I’ve decided to downsize. In 2016, I’m challenging myself to a single intention: Do more with less.

I imagine this statement will mean different things to different people, but for me, it’s a dare from my inner minimalist to focus on creative simplicity.

More with less...in the closet

Because of Redress, I’ve started thinking more about my wardrobe. Although clothes are a significant part of my life -- they literally touch me everyday -- I’m far less conscious of them than I’d like to be.

Over time, I have amassed a swarm of garments, shoes and scarves so unwieldy and muddled, I couldn’t be aware of, or actually wear, each piece this year if I tried. It’s pretty much the opposite of doing more with less, and I’m ready to change that.

A capsule wardrobe is basically a mini wardrobe made up of really versatile pieces that you totally LOVE to wear.
— Caroline Rector

You may already be aware of the “capsule wardrobe” concept, but it’s new to me and I’m fascinated by it. A capsule wardrobe is, as style blogger Caroline Rector puts it, “a mini wardrobe made up of really versatile pieces that you totally LOVE to wear.” I first learned about capsule wardrobes from Caroline’s blog, Unfancy, where she documents outfits from her own seasonal capsule wardrobes and shares how she makes minimalism work for her closet.

There are lots of reasons to create a capsule wardrobe. For Caroline, it was because she was a self-diagnosed shopaholic that needed to put a cap on her spending habit. For me, it’s about recognizing new possibilities in the pieces I already own and truly appreciating their value.

Whatever your reason might be, creating a capsule wardrobe this season is a great way to incorporate sustainability into your closet and #GiveADamn about the whole fashion lifecycle. By limiting the size of my wardrobe, if I shop, I’ll be forced to do it consciously, buying items that will have a purpose and last through more wears per season. I’ll take better advantage of the items already my closet, and might even make some money consigning my least-worn pieces.

This will definitely be a “do more with less” challenge, but I’m ready to take it on.

If you’d like to join me in the challenge, or want to learn more about simplifying your closet, check out Unfancy’s steps to build a capsule wardrobe. And check back here in January for an update on my first attempt at a Winter capsule!

About the author Carrie is Redress’s long-time graphic designer. She loves good local eats, her rescue pup Daisy, and still thinks that dress was white and gold.

About the author

Carrie is Redress’s long-time graphic designer. She loves good local eats, her rescue pup Daisy, and still thinks that dress was white and gold.